First go and meet the breed. Look out for advertised Barbet walks, Discover Dogs at Crufts and some dog shows and other events. You can also find a Barbet to meet via the breed club – we have owners all over who are happy to allow potential new owners to come and meet their dogs and chat about the breed. Ask the owners questions about temperament, coat care, activities, and generally about living with a Barbet.

You can also contact Barbet breeders on our breeders list and arrange to meet their dogs. You can find them under the Breeding heading on our website. These are breeders who have agreed to breed in line with the ethics of the club with regard to care and health testing. This can be in UK or overseas.

Most owners will be happy to show off their Barbets regardless of whether they are breeders or not.

Once you have found a breeder, ask to visit them to see the dogs in their home environment, ideally before puppies are born. Meet the mother and ask if it is possible to visit the father. This is not a cause for concern, as in many cases the father is not owned by the same breeder. The breeder should be happy to tell you about him and show you photos, it might also be possible to arrange to meet him unless distance is too great.

Be prepared to be asked many questions by the breeder and have a list of questions to ask them in return. Remember that if you are buying from a breeder overseas, they will have to keep the puppy until they are at least 15 weeks old. It is their responsibility to provide the Pet passport and export pedigree, this will incur additional cost.

See our Health and Registration advice, which will give you information of the advised health tests. You can find this under the Breeding heading on our website.

A few suggested questions you could ask.

  • Ask to see all relevant health tests and Kennel Club registration documents for both parents of the puppies. You can also look at these online on the Kennel Club website MYKC (however in the case of a non UK dog the tests are unlikely to show up as the KC only shows tests from UK recognised bodies).
  • Why did the breeder breed this dog – what are the aims of the litter and why did they choose this stud dog?
  • If looking for a working or a show dog – has the breeder got the experience to guide you towards an appropriate puppy for this activity?
  • Where will the puppies be raised?
  • Will puppies be Kennel Club registered and have Kennel Club endorsements? Will they be lifted and if so under what circumstances?
  • What socialisation will be done with the puppies before they leave for their new homes?
  • Will Mum have access to the puppies right up until they leave for their new homes?
  • Ask what support the breeder will give you. A good breeder will support new owners for the lifetime of their dogs.
  • Ask how the puppies will be matched with new homes. You may well have to wait until a suitable puppy becomes available. A good breeder will match a puppy with a home, so because you may be top of a breeders puppy list doesn’t mean you will have pick of litter or even a puppy from that litter.

When you are invited to meet the puppies.

  • Do the mother and her puppies appear to be in good health?
  • Will the puppies be vet checked before they leave the breeder?
  • Will the breeder be available as a point of contact to offer advice and support?
  • Ask to see a copy of the puppy contract before any deposit or payment is made.

A breeders puppy pack should ideally include:

  • Contract of Sale of Puppy.
  • Copies of parents Kennel Club reg and health tests.
  • Puppies Kennel Club registration and Pedigree.
  • Microchip certificate and transfer code, and insurance information.
  • A diet sheet. What food the puppy has been fed and when.
  • A bag of puppy food is usually included and advice on what to feed.
  • Information on worming and flea treatment and vaccination.
  • General advice for puppy owners.
  • Overseas puppies should have a pet passport and export pedigree which enables you to register your puppy with UK Kennel Club.